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Procedural Sedation - #PHARMFAX

Procedural sedation is patient-specific depending on procedure, in addition to degree of pain and anxiety.

 

Procedural sedation is patient-specific depending on procedure, in addition to degree of pain and anxiety.


Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics makes certain agents preferable in specific cases.


Indications for procedural sedation include need for imaging in MRI, lumbar punctures, abscess drainage, and joint or bone reductions.


Here’s some procedural sedation deposits for the drug bank; midazolam, etomidate, and methohexital.


These agents are considered cardiovascular neutral.


Midazolam has a slow onset, etomidate isn’t suitable for bone reductions due to myoclonus, and methohexital has minimal amnestic properties compared to others on the table. As a rapid acting barbituate, methohexital is a great option for cardioversions.


We also have ketamine and propofol.


Ketamine dissociates the brain through NMDA receptor antagonism and considered more sympathomimetic.


Its the single agent that also provides analgesia on the table, but still be mindful of opioids for analgesia for all agents.


Propofol acts on GABA with a reliable, titratable sedative effects. Caution in patients with poor cardiovascular reserve.


Master these agents individually before considering KETOFOL.


For more PHARMFAX in the drug bank, put your likes on the video, and I hope you learned something new.


Recommended Read/Watch


Induction Agents Overview: https://www.instagram.com/p/CpnQvfkoIyU/


Induction Agents Safety: https://www.instagram.com/p/CpsY_fvPXgR/


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