top of page

Alcoholic Megablastic Anemia - #PHARMFAX

Updated: Aug 2, 2023

Alcoholism contributes tohematologic disorders, including anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia.

 

Alcoholism contributes tohematologic disorders, including anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Alcoholic Megaloblastic Anemia is likely multifactorial. Alcohol directly and indirectly decreases absorption, increases urinary excretion, and alters metabolism disrupting folate hemostasis.


Folate is crucial for DNA synthesis. In the setting of folate deficiency, folate targets rapidly proliferating cells from bone marrow and gastrointestinal tract. This results in suppression of blood cell production and prevention of maturation into functional cells. Patients are at high risk of iron and folate deficiencies from poor intake and/or effects from chronic alcoholism. Impaired red blood cells cannot carry oxygen at full capacity, thats kind of important


We’ve got vitamin B9 in the drug bank. Rule out cobalamin-deficiency anemia as they have similiar clinical manifestations. Daily doses of 800 mcg and greater are needed to achieve maximal reduction in homocysteine, an intermediate associated with folate . Lower doses, such as 0.2 mg daily, can achieve optimal effects if taken for at least 6 months. Folic acid comes available enterally and IV. Did you share the #PHARMFAX? I’d appreciate a like on the video, and I hope you learned something new.


Recommended Read/Watch


Esophageal Varices - https://www.instagram.com/p/CtaqiF7AEd4/


Alcoholic Ketoacidosis - https://www.instagram.com/p/Cr6EvZHpLk6/


Lactulose and Rifaxamin for Hepatic Encephalopathy - https://www.instagram.com/p/Cpu9sVsonnb/


The ALL PHARMWYZE SOURCE (including references) | Follow @pharmwyze


www.pharmwyze.com


Commentaires


bottom of page